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January 2015 Archives

How does a holographic will differ from other wills?

People write wills to make their wishes for after their deaths known. In order to avoid a will contest and ensure that the wishes are carried out, however, it is very important to ensure that a will is valid and meets the legal requirements for a will. In general, a will is presumed to be valid under the law until and unless someone challenges the will or rebuts the presumption of its validity.

What property is subject to probate?

When it comes to the legal system, it is common for St. Paul residents to have a general familiarity with certain legal procedures, without knowing the details unless and until they become personally involved in a legal proceeding. This is often the case with estate administration, as individuals may have a will or trust and be familiar with some basic issues underlying those documents, without having a detailed understanding of how their estate will be settled after they die.

When it comes to estate planning, everyone is different

From time to time, St. Paul residents have disagreements with their friends, family, coworkers or others. Even between those within the closest of relationships, there can be important differences of opinion, particularly when it comes to sensitive matters like financial issues.

Does a spouse always get all of the deceased spouse's estate?

For many St. Paul residents, there is nobody who shares a more intimate and personal relationship with the individual than his or her spouse. Many spouses share virtually everything, including the handling of the family's finances. Accordingly, it is no surprise that individuals often leave their estates to their surviving spouse when it comes to estate planning.

Estate planning has something for everyone

There are many misconceptions about estate planning. For instance, many St. Paul residents may think that estate planning is something that only wealthy people do, because those without a substantial amount of money and assets do not need an estate plan. Nothing could be further from the truth, however, as estate planning is something that is in everyone's best interests, no matter what their situation in life may be.